WHAT IS ELECTRIC SHOCK DROWNING?


Electric Shock Drowning (ESD) is the result of the passage of a typically low level AC current through the body with sufficient force to cause skeletal muscular paralysis, rendering the victim unable to help himself / herself, while immersed in fresh water, eventually resulting in drowning of the victim.  Higher levels of AC current in the water will also result in electrocution.  Electric Shock Drowning (ESD) has become the catch all phrase that encompasses all in-water shock casualties and fatalities.

Source:  Electric Shock Drowning Prevention Association

 

THE PROBLEM OF ELECTRIC SHOCK DROWNING

ON JULY 4, 2012, THE FAMILIES OF 10-year-old Noah Winstead and 11-year-old Nate Lynam were celebrating together on Lake Cherokee, located in the small northwestern Tennessee town of Bean Station. The day started like any other holiday on the lake, filled with swimming, boating, and barbecuing. That afternoon, though, Noah and Nate were swimming in a marina when they received an electrical shock. Noah died instantly from electrocution, and Nate died in the hospital the next day. Several other people who jumped into the water to save the boys were injured, but survived. An investigation found that the source of the electricity was current leaking from a boat that was plugged into the marina’s electrical system.

Source:  NFPA Journal - May/June 2015